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Saturday, April 11th, 2009

Subject:Quote of the Day
Posted by:leopold_paula_b.
Time:8:53 am.
Please by acquiester to meek my acquointance! Codling, snakelet, iciclist! My diaper has more life to it!
Comments: Read 1 orAdd Your Own.

Friday, April 10th, 2009

Subject:Quote of the Day
Posted by:leopold_paula_b.
Time:9:42 am.
I awed to have scourched his Abarm's brack for him. For the loaf of Obadiah, take your pastryart's noas out of me flouer bouckuet.
Comments: Add Your Own.

Thursday, April 9th, 2009

Subject:Quote of the Day
Posted by:leopold_paula_b.
Time:1:03 am.
(for after a good night's rave and rumble and a shinkhams topmorning with his coexes he was not the same man)
Comments: Add Your Own.

Wednesday, April 8th, 2009

Subject:Quote of the Day
Posted by:leopold_paula_b.
Time:7:59 pm.

(Fritz Senn says that a Finnegans Wake quote of the day calender would be a nice thing to have. Isolating and looking at a line or two might teach us something. Right:)

The ring man in the rong shop but the rite words by the rote order!
(167.32f)

Comments: Read 3 orAdd Your Own.

Wednesday, January 7th, 2009

Subject:Adaline Glasheen, Third Census of Finnegans Wake
Posted by:leopold_paula_b.
Time:6:33 pm.

Today Adaline Glasheen's "Third Census of Finnegans Wake" arrived. I didn't have the time to even browse it yet, but immediately a maybe stupid question popped up: What about the First and Second, then? Are there any? And are they worth hunting down, or just earlier versions of "Third Census"?

EDIT: Managed to read the title page, solved: "Revised and expanded from the Second Census". (And sorry, not to even open the book before posting such a question was stupid.)
Comments: Add Your Own.

Friday, February 29th, 2008

Posted by:leopold_paula_b.
Time:2:12 pm.
Happy Leap Day Everybody! 
Comments: Read 2 orAdd Your Own.

Monday, February 26th, 2007

Subject:reeling
Posted by:leopold_paula_b.
Time:4:36 pm.
And roll away the reel world, the reel world, the reel world! (FW 64.24f)

It is a reeling world, indeed, my lord; (Richard III; III.ii)

Roland McHugh makes no note of that. What do you say: Echo or not?
Comments: Read 1 orAdd Your Own.

Friday, February 2nd, 2007

Posted by:enion.
Time:11:44 pm.
Happy Birthday J.J.

Comments: Add Your Own.

Saturday, December 30th, 2006

Subject:soft morning, city!
Posted by:leopold_paula_b.
Time:7:37 pm.
(1)

Soft morning, city! Lsp! I am leafy speafing. Lpf! Folty and
folty all the nights have falled on to long my hair. Not a sound,
falling. Lispn! No wind no word. Only a leaf, just a leaf and
then leaves. The woods are fond always. As were we their babes
in. And robins in crews so. It is for me goolden wending.
Unless? Away! Rise up, man of the hooths, you have slept so
long! Or is it only so mesleems? On your pondered palm.
Reclined from cape to pede. With pipe on bowl. Terce for a
fiddler, sixt for makmerriers, none for a Cole. Rise up now and
aruse! Norvena's over. I am leafy, your goolden, so you called
me, may me life, yea your goolden, silve me solve, exsogerraider!
You did so drool. I was so sharm. But there's a great poet in you
too. Stout Stokes would take you offly. So has he as bored me
to slump. But am good and rested. Taks to you, toddy, tan ye!
Yawhawaw. Helpunto min, helpas vin. Here is your shirt, the day
one, come back. The stock, your collar. Also your double brogues.
A comforter as well. And here your iverol and everthelest your



(2)

Soft morning [1]* [/], city! Lsp! [2] I am leafy speafing [3] [%]. Lpf! Folty and folty [4] all the nights have falled on to long my hair. Not a sound, falling. Lispn! [5] No wind no word. Only a leaf, just a leaf and then leaves. The woods are fond always. As were we their babes in [6] ["]. And robins in crews so [7] [§] [$] [/]. It is for me goolden wending [8]. Unless? Away! Rise up, man of the hooths [9] [/], you have slept so long [&] [/]! Or is it only so mesleems [10]? On your pondered palm. Reclined from cape to pede [11]. With pipe on bowl [12]. Terce [13] for a fiddler [12] [14], sixt [13] for makmerriers [14], none [13] for a Cole [14]. Rise up now and aruse [15]! Norvena's [16] over. I am leafy, your goolden [17] ["], so you called me, may [17] me life, yea your goolden, silve me solve, exsogerraider [18]! You did so drool. I was so sharm [19]. But there's a great poet in you [!] too. Stout Stokes [20] would take you offly [21]. So has he as bored [22] me to slump [23]. But am good and rested ["]. Taks [24] to you, toddy, tan ye [25]! Yawhawaw [26]. Helpunto min, helpas vin [27]. Here is your shirt [28], the day one, come back [29]. The stock [30], your collar. Also your double brogues. A comforter as well. And here your iverol [31] and everthelest [32] your

[1]: AngI soft day: light drizzle, [/]: a reference to Shakespeare's Cleopatra dying. The poison of the asp ("as sweet as balm, as soft as air, as gentle", V.ii.309), "has made her delirious", she's "losing consciousness", "death, passion, and revolution", [2]: lisp, [3]: Liffey speaking, [%]: "She is of course, not just the "Leafy" (or Liffey). She is the leaves of the tree of life, now falling;" [4]: I foltach: long-haired, It capelli folti: thick hair, Gen 7:17: 'the flood was forty days upon the earth', [5]: listen, [6]: Babes in the Wood (pantomime), ["]: "The two begin to walk, going forward into an innocence that encompasses them both", [7]: Robinson Crusoe (pantomime), [§]: "ist uns sofort einsichtig, daß die Wortgrenzen andere sein müßten bzw. ursprünglich andere waren. Und dies führt uns zurück zur kabbalistischen Lesetheorie", [$]: "Findet sich an einer Stelle 'Rabbinsohn Crucis' (243.31) [...] so verweisen diese Fassungen nur insofern aufeinander, als dadurch die Einzigartigkeit (die Epiphanie) der jeweiligen Wendung hervorgehoben wird", [/]: "The choirs of robins in the foolish ("fond") woods suggest through Robinson Crusoe the idea of a new, undiscovered world", [8]: golden wedding, [9]: house, Howth, [/]: "Here the man she calls to is the one buried in the hill of Howth", [&]: "More vigorous and mobile than he, she pulls him up and out into life.", [/]: "As HCE's supporter she wants him to stand clear or stand out clearly as a unity [...] ambiguiy about whether HCE is alive" [10]: meseems, [11]: cap-à-pie: head to foot, [12]: nr 'Old King Cole was a merry old soul & a merry old soul was he, He sent for his pipe & he sent for his bowl & he sent for his fiddlers three, [13]: Tierce, Sext, Nones (canonical hours), [14]: Finn ... Mac ... Cool, [15]: arise, [16]: novena, Nirvana, [17]: U.580: 'I was once the beautiful May Goulding', ["]: "seems to echo Gerald Manley Hopkins's poem that begins, 'Margaret, are you grieving/ Over Goldengrove unleaving,' a poem about a child's reluctance to leave innocence behind to enter into the 'fallen' world of adult sexuality", [18]: exaggerator, Arch soger: soldier, [19]: F charmante, [!]: cf. U "There's a touch of the artist about old Bloom", [20]: Whitley Stokes: Celtic authority, [21]: Co. Offaly, [22]: tidal bore, [23]: sleep, ["]: "she reassures her father hat she's up to their long walk", [24]: Da tak: thank you, [25]: s Johnny, I Hardly Knew Ye, [26]: YHWH: Tetragrammaton, [27]: Es (synthetic) helpunto min, helpas vin: one who would help me helps you [28]: nightshirt (Parnell), [29]: from laundry, [30]: stock: a tight-fitting neckcloth, [31]: overall, [32]: nevertheless

*numbered footnotes taken from Roland McHugh's "Annotations to Finnegans Wake", the others: [%]: Anthony Burgess, "ReJoyce", [!]: Richard Ellmann, "Ulysses on the Liffey", [§]: Klaus Reichert, "Die Struktur des Hebräischen und die Sprache von Finnegans Wake", [$]: Klaus Reichert, "Zur Einübung in die Lektüre von Finnegans Wake", [&]: Brenda Maddox, "Nora", [/]: Sheldon Brivic, "Joyce's Waking Women", ["]: Carol Loeb Shloss, "Lucia Joyce"

Abbreviations: AngI: Anglo-Irish, I: Irish (modern spelling), It: Italian, nr: nursery rhyme, U: Ulysses (page number from 1961 Random house edition), Arch: archaic, F: French, Da: Danish, s: song, Es: Esperanto



(3)

Soft morning, city! Lsp! I am leafy speafing. Lpf! Folty and
folty all the nights have falled on to long my hair. Not a sound,
falling. Lispn! No wind no word. Only a leaf, just a leaf and
then leaves. The woods are fond always. As were we their babes
in. And robins in crews so. It is for me goolden wending.
Unless? Away! Rise up, man of the hooths, you have slept so
long! Or is it only so mesleems? On your pondered palm.
Reclined from cape to pede. With pipe on bowl. Terce for a
fiddler, sixt for makmerriers, none for a Cole. Rise up now and
aruse! Norvena's over. I am leafy, your goolden, so you called
me, may me life, yea your goolden, silve me solve, exsogerraider!
You did so drool. I was so sharm. But there's a great poet in you
too. Stout Stokes would take you offly. So has he as bored me
to slump. But am good and rested. Taks to you, toddy, tan ye!
Yawhawaw. Helpunto min, helpas vin. Here is your shirt, the day
one, come back. The stock, your collar. Also your double brogues.
A comforter as well. And here your iverol and everthelest your
Comments: Read 1 orAdd Your Own.

Friday, December 15th, 2006

Subject:met him pike hoses
Posted by:iwokeup.
Time:11:58 am.
So I did the Finnegans Wake thing before doing Ulysses, not that you ever really finish doing the wake thing, but I did read every word in the book at least once. Anyway, I’m about half way finished with Ulysses and I’m convinced that they’re the same book. Has anyone else had this experience?
Comments: Read 3 orAdd Your Own.

Thursday, November 9th, 2006

Subject:teuf-teuf
Posted by:leopold_paula_b.
Time:11:36 pm.
"mishe mishe to tauftauf".

now, apart from a lot of biblical and other thoughts that came to my mind i was struck, when i read the following passage in p.g. wodehouse "very good, jeeves!" (1930):


"well, teuf-teuf," i said moodily and withdrew.


in french "teuf-teuf" means the sound of a train (töff-töff in my native german). it seems to indicate some kind of good-bye.

is this a phrase common to english native speakers?

-------- ---- ---- -

UP-DATE: majolika provided me with the following information:

lookie,
in here

http://www.randomhouse.co.uk/catalog/book.htm?command=Search&db=main.txt&eqisbndata=0091885124

is that:


KNUTS

Psmith, in appearance and, very broadly, manner, is the Knut. The Knut was not a Wodehouse invention. He was a fashion-eddy of late Edwardianism, though his line goes back to the dandy and the fop of earlier centuries. Captain Good, rn, in Rider Haggard's King Solomon's Mines, wore a guttapercha collar, a monocle, matching hat and jacket and impeccable other kit in the African bush, to the amusement of his companions and Rider Haggard's readers, but not to the lessening of his own dignity. Punch was making jokes about the Knut at the same time as Wodehouse was using him as part of Psmith.

The Knut was an amiable person. You could laugh at him kindly. He cultivated a 'blah' manner and vocabulary. Some of Psmith's vocabulary was from early Knut sources. 'Oojah-cum-spiff' and 'Rannygazoo', both Knut locutions, were used by Psmith first, and later by Bertie Wooster. When Bertie Wooster used 'Oojah-cum-spiff' and 'Rannygazoo' in the 1920s, they sounded, to the reader too young to have known the Knut language, like personal Wodehouse/Wooster fabrications. In the Wodehouse play Good Morning, Bill of which the novel Dr Sally is virtually a transcript, Lord Tidmouth, a Knut, says goodbye in six different ways: 'Bung-ho', 'Teuf-teuf', 'Tinkerty-tonk', 'Toodle-oo', 'Poo-boop-a-doop' and 'Honk-honk'.

Knut language, like any other generic slang, substituted for the sake of substitution. It was the manner of the Knut to call a man a 'cove' or a 'stout sportsman'. In The Lighter Side of School Life Ian Hay, discussing Dean Farrar's Eric, says 'No schoolboy ever called lighted candles "superfluous abundance of nocturnal illumination".' Psmith could have. Psmith, instead of 'tea' says 'a cup of the steaming'. Psmith, first in Wodehouse, plays variations on the already several-times-removed-from-reality imagist phrase 'in the soup'. Psmith refers to 'consomme splashing about the ankles' and someone being 'knee-deep in the bouillon'. He always prefers the orotund to the curt. Instead of 'shoot a goal' he says 'push the bulb into the meshes beyond the uprights'. 'Archaeology will brook no divided allegiance from her devotees', and 'the dream of my youth and aspirations of my riper years' - these are pleasant enough suggestions of pulpit pomp. In the crowded school study they would certainly be given in a parody voice, adding a specific victim to the general parody. The headmaster or the padre would be the local wax figure for the group to stick their verbal pins into.


* * *

Personally I always read it as "Moshe Moshe -> baptize baptize -> St.Patrick St.Patrick", sort of a fast forward lesson in ecclesiastical history;)
Comments: Read 2 orAdd Your Own.

Monday, October 30th, 2006

Subject:Blake
Posted by:leopold_paula_b.
Time:12:15 am.
I've just finished "Four Zoas" by William Blake and maybe only understood a little part of it, but I couldn't ignore parallels to "Finnegans Wake".



Wikipedia on Four Zoas (vide "Albion"):

"In the complex mythology of William Blake, Albion is the primeval man whose fall and division results in the Four Zoas: Urizen, Tharmas, Luvah, and Los/Urthona. The name derives from the ancient and mythological name of the British Isles (see Albion).

The long, unfinished poem properly called Vala, or the Four Zoas, expands the significance of the Zoas, but they are integral to all of Blake's prophetic books.

The division of the primordial man is found in many mythic and mystic systems throughout the world, including Adam Kadmon in cabalism and Prajapati in the Rig-Veda."



Not much really, but enough to get the idea. I just want to add that Urizen & Ahania represent Reason, Faith, Certainty; Luvah & Vala: Passion, Love; Tharmas & Enion: Sensation, Coherence, Receptivity; Urthona & Enitharmon: Instinct, Creativity.

(All of them are prone to Fall, very Wakean indeed: so Faith turns to Doubt and Tyranny; Love to Rebellion and Revolution; Coherence to Chaos; and Creativity to, erm... obviously to Poetry and Prophecy. I'm not quite sure how this is a "Fall". As I've said I don't understand too much of this. And there are two more entities involved: Orc is the fallen form of Luvah; Los the fallen form of Urthona.)
Comments: Read 8 orAdd Your Own.

Sunday, October 1st, 2006

Subject:play popeye antipop
Posted by:leopold_paula_b.
Time:12:13 am.
My wish for Christmas would be a book about "Charleston, Comics, and Cinema. Flapper Culture and Finnegans Wake". Does anybody know any work like that?

Anybody else interested in such topics? We might start some gathering:

Black Bottom (dance), Charlie Chaplin, Mutt and Jeff, Popeye, "Yes, We Have No Bananas"...

I am thinking about making lists like the following ones

about Popeye:

as innocens with anaclete play popeye antipop (13.29f)
I appop pie oath, Phillyps Captain (67.22)
the already unhappiness of this our popeyed world (189.10)
Olive d'Oyly and Winnie Carr (279.F1)
pfoor puff pive pippive, poopive (282.31f)
I am yam (481.35)
D'Oyly Owens (574.1)
I yam as I yam (604.23)

"Yes, We Have No Bananas":

Yass We've Had His Badannas (71.11f)
yea, he hath no mananas (170.20)

What comes to your minds?
Comments: Read 4 orAdd Your Own.

Saturday, September 30th, 2006

Subject:"A Night at the Opera", or: "Music-hall, not Poetry, is a Criticism of Life."
Posted by:leopold_paula_b.
Time:6:38 pm.
what's your "soundtrack" of fw?

wagner's "tristan und isolde" (and his "ring des nibelungen": "rheingold", "walküre", "siegfried", "götterdämmerung") seems a very obvious undercurrent through the whole book.

"mememormee" always reminds me of dido's lament "remember me" at the end of purcell's opera.

"I'll dreamt that I'll dwealth mid warblers' walls when throstles and choughs to my sigh hiehied": "i dreamt that i dwelt in marble halls/ with vassals and serfs at my si-i-ide" (balfe, the bohemian girl; maria sings this at the end of dubliners' "clay")

also verdi's "otello" in passages like "Una, Vela" or "il folsoletto nel falsoletto col fazzolotto dal fuzzolezzo"


"when yea, he hath no mananas" kind of "is" the 1920's hit "yes!, we have no bananas".

and: "I yam as I yam" is from popeye's theme

so, what do you hear?

ps: "you're the cream in my coffee" was one of lucia's favourite popular tunes. any traces of that in fw? (i'd appreciate any hint.)
Comments: Read 5 orAdd Your Own.

Saturday, July 15th, 2006

Subject:hardest crux ever
Posted by:leopold_paula_b.
Time:12:04 pm.
fw's least accessible chapters are II.3 and III.3 for me.

(II.3: It may not or maybe a no concern of th Guinnesses but... p. 309-382)

(III.3: Lowly, longly a wail went forth. Pure Yawn lay low... p. 474-554)

how about you?
Comments: Read 3 orAdd Your Own.

Thursday, July 6th, 2006

Posted by:leopold_paula_b.
Time:2:40 pm.
as nobody seems to be doing much here, i think i'll just contribute there:

http://www.finnegansweb.com/wiki/index.php/TOC

(also, that's organized in a handy way.)

of course, i'll still check if some discussion or even a reading project gets started here anyway, and am eager to participate if it does so.
Comments: Read 4 orAdd Your Own.

Friday, June 16th, 2006

Subject:past Eve and
Posted by:leopold_paula_b.
Time:12:36 am.
"past Eve and": "pa|st Eve an|d": "pa" & "Stephen"

(remark by Hugh Kenner to Brenda Maddox, who mentions in her biography of Nora)

cf.: "A child is sleeping:/ An old man gone." (JJ., Ecce Puer, February 1932, on the coincidence of his grandson's Stephen's birth and of his father's John Joyce's death)

and here the whole poem:

Of the dark past
A child is born;
With joy and grief
My heart is torn.

Calm in his cradle
The living lies.
May love and mercy
Unclose his eyes!

Young life is breathed
On the glass;
The world that was not
Comes to pass.

A child is sleeping:
An old man gone.
O, father forsaken,
Forgive your son!
Comments: Read 1 orAdd Your Own.

Sunday, May 21st, 2006

Subject:Hamlet's Monologue in FW
Posted by:leopold_paula_b.
Time:6:10 pm.
To be, or not to be, that is the question

/at weare or not at weare (fw 319; at väre, danish: to be)
/me ken or no me ken Zot is the Quiztune (fw 110)
/Hanno, o Nonanno, acce'l brubblemm'as (fw 182; italian: quest è il problema)
/To me or not to me. Satis thy quest on (fw 269)
/[To enter or not to enter. To knock or not to knock. (ulysses, ithaca)]

Whether 'tis nobler in my mind, to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune

/Where it is nobler in the main to supper than the boys and errors of outrager's virtue (fw 434)

't is a consummation
Devoutly to be wished

/a satuation, debauchly to be watched for (fw 319)

When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin?

/bare godkin (fw 79)

from whose bourne
No traveller returns

/bourne of travail (fw 190)

Thus conscience does make cowards of us all

/thus plinary indulgence makes colleunellas of us all (fw 319)
Comments: Read 10 orAdd Your Own.

Subject:the first riddle of the universe: asking, when is a man not a man?
Posted by:leopold_paula_b.
Time:5:08 pm.
fw 170 (i've numbered the answers for convenience's sake.)

-----

the first riddle of the universe: asking, when is a man not a man?: telling them take their time, yungfries, and wait till the tide stops (for from the first his day was a fortnight) and offering the prize of a bittersweet crab, a
little present from the past, for their copper age was yet
unminted, to the winner.

1) One said when the heavens are quakers,

2) a second said when Bohemeand lips,

3) a third said when he, no, when hold hard a jiffy, when he is a gnawstick and detarmined to,

4) the next one said when the angel of death kicks the bucket of life,

5) still another said when the wine's at witsends,

6) and still another when lovely wooman stoops to conk him,

7) one of the littliest said me, me, Sem, when pappa papared the harbour,

8) one of the wittiest said, when he yeat ye abblokooken and he zmear hezelf zo zhooken,

9) still one said when you are old I'm grey fall full wi sleep,

10) and still another when wee deader walkner,

11) and another when he is just only after having being semisized,

12) another when yea, he hath no mananas,

13) and one when dose pigs they begin now that they will flies up intil the looft.

14) All were wrong, so Shem himself, the doctator, took the cake, the correct solution being -- all give it up? -- ; when he is a -- yours till the rending of the rocks, -- Sham.

-----

so, what do we understand?

quakers (1), bohemian protestants (Bohemeand, 2) and [a]gnostics (gnawstick, 3) are heretics.

(2) seems to be an allusion to balfe's opera the BOHEMIAN girl. the aria "then you'll remember me" (very prominently quoted in dubliner's "clay") contains the words "when other LIPS". (but i have no clue, what this has got to do with the riddle.)

(4): kick the bucket vs. life

(5): "when the wine is in the wit is out" & "be at one's wits' end"

(6): "when lovely woman stoops to folly" (goldsmith, The vicar of WAKEfield) & "she stoops to conquer" (play by goldsmith)

(7): a song: "when papa papered the parlour"

(8): something about yeats and paradise (yabloko, russian: apple; apfelkuchen, german: appletart, zmeya, russian: snake)

(9): yeats: "when you are old and grey and full of sleep"

(10): ibsen: "naar vi dode vaagner" (when we dead aWAKEn), the play joyce reviewed, when he was young.

(12): a song: "yes, we have no bananas" & manana, spanish: tomorrow

(13): "when pigs begin to fly": never; luft, german: air

(14): ragnarokr: destruction of the norse gods & shamrocks & "the earth did quake, and the rocks rent" (Matt 27:51)

(those clues are taken from McHugh's Annotations. as to the correct solution i found this in Petr Skrabanek, Night Joyce of a Thousand Tiers:)

The answer to the central riddle of the Wake, Shem's riddle, when is a man not a man, is easy,-when he is a noman.

Joyce divided the name of Ulysses into outis (Noman) and Zeus. If Homer could make a pun on Odysseus's name, Joyce, our "homerole poet" (445.32) could do the same with the name of Shem.

Shem in Hebrew means name, or God's name. As Hebrew reads backwards, nomen (name) gives nemon. Nemo in Latin means Noman. Noman holds the key to the Wake, in Revelations 5:3 "No man ... was able to open the book," and in the words of Noman Jesus: "I will give unto thee the keys ... then he charged his disciples that they should tell to no man" (Matthew 16:20).

Shem's riddle, with its solution hidden within Shem's name is modelled on the most famous riddle of all times, the riddle of the Sphinx ... "riddle a rede from the sphinxish pairc" (324.06), the Sphinx of the Phoenix Park. "There is on earth a thing which has four legs, two legs, and three legs, and one voice." The answer, provided by Oedipus, was-man: in infancy on all four, with a stick in old age, and on two in between. The answer was hidden in Oedipus's own name: oida (I know) and dipous (biped, man), i.e. "I know that the answer is man," "know-man." As Sophocles put it: "The riddling Sphinx caused us to turn our eyes to what lay at out feet."



there's much left to be explained. can you contribute?
Comments: Add Your Own.

Sunday, May 7th, 2006

Subject:concordex
Posted by:leopold_paula_b.
Time:8:36 pm.
i find this tool very usefull in scanning through finnegans wake:

http://mv.lycaeum.org/Finnegan/finnegan.cgi?mode=new&simple=boolean&kwor=

(e.g., so it's very easy to find all passages that include the wonderful word "sinse" [since & sins & sense]: 83.12, 227.31, 239.2, 338.2)
Comments: Read 4 orAdd Your Own.

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